10 Quick & Easy Ways to Make Your Customers Feel Important

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It is critical to make your customers feel important.

If they don’t feel that you value them, they will quickly take their business elsewhere and tell all their friends why they did so resulting in a reduced bottom line.

Many companies do a poor job of this so check yourself to make sure you and the other people who deal with your customers are using some of these techniques.

  1. Use Their Name.

First, use their name at the beginning and end of the conversation if possible. Often you can get this off a credit card. Then remember that name if he or she is a regular customer. If you deal with customers mostly on the telephone, try to recognize their voices.

2. Make Eye Contact.

Look them in the eyes and sincerely say, “How may I help you?” with a big smile. If you remember that every customer is your paycheck, it will be easier to do. Eye contact is also a critical part of making the customer feel important.

3.  “Pepper” Your Telephone Conversation.

Or, if it is on the telephone, build some rapport by saying something like, “I’ll be happy to help you.” And pepper your conversation with words like “Thank you,” “Please,” and “May I?” And say things like, “Are you able to hold?” rather then “Please hold.”

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4. Smile Sincerely.

The basic act of smiling is also important to making your customer feel important. But don’t give them a smile that doesn’t show your teeth. That is called an “insincere smile’ by body language experts and can actually turn off your customer by making a negative impression. Give a big sincere smile as if you were greeting your best friend.

5. Don’t Forget Internal Customers.

Don’t forget about your internal customers—your co workers. They also deserve to be made to feel important, so check yourself to see if you are doing these things for them, too.

6. Avoid “Command” Language.

Another technique to make your customers feel important is to avoid “command language.” Instead of demanding, “Name,” “Address,” “Telephone number,” say, “May I please have your name?” And your telephone number is…?” instead.

7. Give Your Undivided Attention.

Give the customer your undivided attention. Don’t continue what you are doing and finish that before you greet the customer. The customer is the most important thing in the world to you—not finishing your paperwork or stocking the shelves. After all why are you doing those tasks if it isn’t for the customer?

8. Show Flexibility.

When a customer wants something that is a little outside the policies and rules of your organization, try to show some flexibility. Now I’m not saying to give away the store. No. But try to bend a little to make your customer happy. This will also make them feel important. If you can’t give them what they want because of policy, try to offer some options.

9. Be Responsive.

Return calls and emails quickly. A fast response will definitely leave the customer feeling that he is important.

10. Acknowledge Every Customer.

Acknowledge and serve customers the minute you see them approach. If you are already busy with another customer, signal with your body language or say something like, “I’ll be with you as soon as I can” to acknowledge that you have seen them and know that they need help.

 

All these things will help your customers feel more important. And that will improve your business.


trevina broussard head shotAbout Trevina Broussard

I share powerful Customer Service tips and insights for front line managers and employees on how to deliver customer service to keep your customer coming back. The name of the game is customer loyalty and it’s not just about satisfaction. It’s about a willingness to be a repeat buyer, willingness to recommend you to others, and resistance to switching to a competitor. Fortunately I learned this lesson through my 15-year corporate career. Poor service is an all-too-frequent experience for us all. I provide a framework for implementing ongoing processes that can build customer loyalty.

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